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24 June 2006

PETCO Foundation Spring A Pet Gives Much-Needed Funding to All wildlife Rescue & Education, Inc

 

Long beach , CA 22 June 2006) ? The PETCO Foundation's annual Spring A Pet, which ended April 16, exceeded $1.7 million in donations. 

 Throughout the four-week fundraiser, customers visiting one of PETCO's more than 790 stores could purchase ?Spring A Pet? donation cards in denominations of $1, $5, $10 and $20, or round-up their purchase. Donors of $20 or more received a "Making a Difference" picture frame.

Each PETCO store selected an animal welfare group that celebrates the human-animal bond, and then collected donations on that organization?s behalf.  This year, All Wildlife Rescue & Education, AWRE, partnered with the PETCO store at 6761 Westminster Blvd. Westminster, CA

?I am very proud that we are able to assist approximately 1,000 animal welfare organizations across the country this year,? said Paul Jolly, Foundation Director and Vice President.  ?There are thousands of animals across the country that will benefit from the generosity of our customers. We?re deeply grateful to be able to organize and distribute this collection effort each year on behalf of all of those animals who depend on us for their well-being.?

How the Money Makes a Difference.  Local proceeds from Spring A Pet 2006 will be used by AWRE to continue with their wildlife rescue and rehabilitation efforts ?Once again, we are all totally overwhelmed with the kindness and generosity PETCO and their customers have shown us.  Without their much needed help, AWRE would not be able to continue our injured wildlife rescue mission.  All of us here at AWRE are truly appreciative of their faith in our agencies instrumentation? stated Kim Thraen, CEO All Wildlife Rescue & Education, Inc  

PETCO (PETC-NASDAQ) is a leading specialty retailer of premium pet food, supplies and services with a commitment to quality animal care and education. PETCO?s strategy is to offer its customers a complete assortment of pet-related products and services at competitive prices, with superior levels of customer service at convenient locations, by hiring pet lovers and training them to become counselors to our pet-loving customers. PETCO operates more than 790 neighborhood stores in 49 states and the District of Columbia , as well as a leading destination for on-line pet food and supplies at www.PETCO.com. 

The PETCO Foundation, PETCO?s non-profit organization, has raised more approximately $30 million since its inception in 1999.  More than 3,300 non-profit grassroots animal welfare organizations from around the nation receive Foundation support. Through the PETCO Foundation, PETCO endeavors to be a community leader in promoting the welfare of companion animals and celebrating the human-animal bond.

  11 June 2006

Another shock here at AWRE, Chris Fowler has turned in her resignation and is no longer associated with AWRE.  We wish her well in her future endeavors and hope she finds greener pastures.  Her work with skunks has truly made a difference.  We are sure going to miss her. 

5 June 2006

  Wow!  May was another record breaking month for AWRE.  We treated 206 animals of 35 different species and were able to release 75% of them.  Yes, we are very proud of ourselves, our work and our results.

  Here?s the latest patient data report for AWRE

 

ALL WILDLIFE RESCUE & EDUCATION PATIENT DATA REPORT 

1 January 2006 through 31 May 2006

 

Species

# Treated

# Released

# Euthanized

#Died

# Placed

1) Anna?s Hummingbird

11

8

1

1

1

2) Barn Owl

14

 

2

 

12

3) Crow

15

8

6

1

 

4) Snowy Plover

1

 

 

1

 

5) Night Heron

5

 

1

2

2

6) Ruddy Duck

3

2

1

 

 

7) Red Tail Hawk

11

4

3

1

3

8) Striped Skunk

7

6

1

 

 

9) Pekin Duck

3

2

1

 

 

10) Mallard, Wild

33

10

4

1

18

11) Opossum

109

9

4

6

90

12) Ring Neck Dove

23

15

6

1

1

13) Cockatiel

5

 

 

1

4

14) Mouse

9

9

 

 

 

15) Western Gull

2

 

2

 

 

16) Eared Grebe

1

1

 

 

 

17) Quail, Japanese

1

 

 

 

1

18) Rabbit, Wild

15

1

1

5

8

19) Red Shouldered Hawk

1

 

 

1

 

20) Coot

6

2

3

1

 

21) Roof Rat

2

 

2

 

 

22) Pigeon

60

35

21

2

2

23) Mallard, Domestic

1

 

 

 

1

24) Black Crowned Heron

1

 

 

2

 

25) Raven

2

 

 

1

1

26) Morning Dove

1

1

 

 

 

27) Kestrel

13

9

2

 

2

28) Duck, Domestic/Hybrid

1

 

 

 

1

29) Squirrel, Tree

10

6

2

 

2

30) Sandpiper

2

1

 

1

 

31) Brown Pelican

7

3

1

3

 

32) Duck, Mexican

1

 

1

 

 

33) California Gull

2

1

1

 

 

34) Coopers Hawk

3

 

3

 

 

35) Rooster, Domestic

1

 

 

 

1

36) Gull, Ring Bill

1

1

 

 

 

37) Gecko

1

 

 

 

1

38) Vole

1

 

1

 

 

39) American Avocet

1

 

 

1

 

40) Sparrow

18

8

5

5

 

 

Species

# Treated

# Released

# Euthanized

#Died

# Placed

41) Dove, Domestic

2

 

 

 

2

42) Mussuranas

1

 

 

 

1

43) Brandt?s Cormorant

1

1

 

 

 

44) Common Loon

1

1

 

 

 

45) Warbler

1

1

 

 

 

46) Burrowing Owl

2

 

1

 

1

47) Mockingbird

7

1

 

4

2

48) Cassin?s Kingbird

1

1

 

 

 

49) Sharp Shinned Hawk

1

1

 

 

 

50) Chinese Goose

1

1

 

 

 

51)  Raccoon

2

 

2

 

 

52) Gold Finch

1

 

1

 

 

53) Blue Jay

1

 

1

 

 

54) Rabbit, Domestic

5

 

 

2

3

55) Great Blue Heron

1

1

 

 

 

56) House Finch

9

4

3

1

1

57) Western Tanager

2

2

 

 

 

58) Crested Sparrow

2

2

 

 

 

59) Duck, Domestic Hybrid

1

1

 

 

 

60) American Robin

1

1

 

 

 

61) Starling

5

3

1

1

 

62) Box Turtle

1

 

1

 

 

63) Great Horned Owl

2

 

 

 

2

64) Scrub Jay

2

2

 

 

 

65) Parakeet

1

 

 

 

1

66) Lorikeet

1

 

 

 

1

67) Gopher Snake

2

2

 

 

 

68) Mitered Conure

1

 

 

 

1

69) Green Backed Heron

1

1

 

 

 

 

2 June 2006

AWRE is swamped, we've been very busy and still are.  In the month of may we treated 206 animals of 35 different species and were able to release 75% of them.  Yes, another record breaking month for AWRE.  I will get our latest data reports published as soon as I get the information into the computer.

22 May 2006

It seems baby season has us burning the candle at both ends while holding the center of the candle over a torch, but if you ask any of us if it is worth all the work, effort and constant struggle, you will get a big, resounding "YES!!!".  I mean take a look at  a few of the patients we had to take responsibility for this morning.  Yes, these are some of the faces of the lives we, AWRE, are accountable for.  This is part of the AWRE mission to be able to release all our patients, when safe for the patient, back into their wild and natural environment

             
                       Great Horned Owlets                                                                                                           Red Tail Hawk

 

     
                                            Barn Owlets                                                                                                        Opossum

 

  
                                Mallard Ducklings                                                                                              Barn Owlet

 

 

4 May 2006

                               

 

 A concerned citizen brought us a Western Tanager whose leg had been broken and entangled with a long length of thread. It probably broke its leg trying to escape from something all this thread had caught on but we?ll never know for sure.

 

After examining this beautiful critter and determining the only problems it had were the broken leg and thread.

 

Using a small pair of scissors, we removed the thread and then proceeded to make a splint for its Tibia (similar to a human?s shin bone).

 

After a couple of weeks the bone had healed and was released back into its natural environment.

 

The Western Tanager is quite common in our area .  It is widespread from the western Alaskan panhandle to northern Baja, preferring to winter in Mexico and central America, now there's a bird after my own heart.

 

The Western Tanager prefers to eat insects but also feeds on  berries and other small fruits depending on the season

 

 

Another patient ready for release

 

 

         
?Thanks for everything, but I?m outta here and this is the last you?ll ever see of me!?

 

 

2 May 2006

 

            April turned out to be another fun and productive month.  We treated 101 critters of 36 different species.  I must admit, the Mussuranas was definitely April?s most unusual critter.  Face it; it is not very often a young child finds, in their South Los Angeles backyard, a venomous, South American snake.  illegal without special permits from the California State Department of Fish & Game Fortunately, no one was bitten and the snake was placed with the San Diego Zoo?s Reptile department, making a happy ending all the way around but the concept of a young child finding a Mussuranas in his backyard in South Los Angeles raises some interesting questions as to this snake?s origins.  It was a young snake so it is possible someone is breeding these illegal snakes and is not very good at their husbandry or it is possible someone is illegally importing these snakes and has lost track of their inventory.  With a little imagination, one can entertain some very interesting hypotheses indeed.

 

            As baby season is well under way, I shall keep this update short and let everyone know AWRE is still treating any injured animal sent our way.  Here is our latest patient data report for 2006

3 April 2006

What an unusual weekend.

This beautiful specimen of what the finder told us was a "Ring Neck Snake" was turned into the AWRE office.

 

The finder, a teacher, stated it was found by a young boy in his backyard in south Los Angeles.

None of us were familiar with a "Ring Neck Snake" so we dug out our textbooks and after a little research, we discovered this snake was a Mussuranas, a rear-fanged venomous snake native to South America.

 

The colors and markings are truly beautiful plus all the hypothetical scenarios of how this South American snake ended up in someone?s backyard in south Los Angeles can be mind boggling.

 

Following the standing AWRE policy of playing the hand we are dealt the best we can, we determined this fine specimen was in good health and face it; we can?t release it back where it was found (south LA) so we started our search for a legal facility which would be interested in providing this snake a proper home.

We were very fortunate as we were able to place this snake with the San Diego Zoo?s Reptile Department.

I just love happy endings.

 

 

7 March 2006

 I just finished filing out the AWRE February patient data and can document that February was another, what can be considered a "slow" month, only treating 41 animals of 15 species, but we kind of consider it the quiet before the storm, with baby season just opening.  Here's our patient data:

ALL WILDLIFE RESCUE & EDUCATION PATIENT DATA REPORT 
1 January 2006 through 28 February 2006

 

Species

# Treated

# Released

# Euthanized

#Died

# Placed

1) Anna?s Hummingbird

3

2

 

1

 

2) Barn Owl

2

 

1

 

1

3) Crow

3

2

1

 

 

4) Snowy Plover

1

 

 

1

 

5) Night Heron

1

 

1

 

 

6) Ruddy Duck

1

 

1

 

 

7) Red Tail Hawk

3

1

2

 

 

8) Striped Skunk

1

1

 

 

 

9) Pekin Duck

1

 

1

 

 

10) Mallard, Wild

1

1

 

 

 

11) Opossum

1

 

 

1

 

12) Ring Neck Dove

5

4

 

 

1

13) Cockatiel

3

 

 

 

3

14) Mouse

9

9

 

 

 

15) Western Gull

1

 

1

 

 

16) Eared Grebe

1

1

 

 

 

17) Quail, Japanese

1

 

 

 

1

18) Rabbit, Wild

6

1

 

4

1

19) Red Shouldered Hawk

1

 

 

1

 

20) Coot

5

2

2

1

 

21) Roof Rat

1

 

1

 

 

22) Pigeon

17

13

3

1

 

23) Mallard, Domestic

1

 

 

 

1

24) Black Crowned Heron

1

 

 

1

 

25) Raven

1

 

 

1

 

26) Morning Dove

1

1

 

 

 

27) Kestrel

3

2

 

 

1

28) Duck, Domestic/Hybrid

1

 

 

 

1

29) Squirrel, Tree

2

2

 

 

 

 

6 March 2006  PETCO Foundation Tree of Hope Gives Much Needed Funding To All Wildlife Rescue & Education

    The PETCO Foundation?s annual Tree of Hope Fundraiser, which ended 24 December, surpassed $2.1 million in donations Customers visiting one of PETCO?s more than 760 stores purchased card ornaments for $1, $5, $10 or $20.  Visitors could also choose from red or blue ?Making a Difference? wristbands or a 2006 PETCO Foundation calendar loaded with coupons-with all funds going toward the Tree of Hope.  Anyone donating $20 or more received a PETCO Foundation hand-painted, globe ornament. Each PETCO store selected an animal welfare group that celebrates the human-animal bond, and then collected donations on that organizations behalf.  This year All Wildlife Rescue & Education partnered with the PETCO store at 6500 Pacific Coast Highway , Long Beach , CA 90815

  The Tree of Hope fundraiser brings the total amount the Foundation raised in 2005 to $6.5 million, compared to $5.7 million in 2004.

  ?I am very proud that we raised 14% more money than 2004,? said Paul Jolly, Foundation Director and Vice President.  ?There are thousands of animals across the country that will benefit from our store visitors? generosity.  We?re deeply grateful to be able to organize and distribute this collection effort each year on behalf of all those animals who depend on us for their well-being.?

  How the Money Makes a Difference.  Local proceeds from the Tree of Hope 2005 will be used by All Wildlife Rescue & Education, AWRE, to continue with their wildlife rescue and rehabilitation services for our community and environment. 

? The only reason AWRE has been able to provide its services per gratis to our community for almost 20 years is due to the generosity of private citizens and caring corporations like PETCO?, said Kim Thraen, Chief Executive Officer. 

PETCO (PETC-NASDAQ) is a leading specialty retailer of premium pet food and supplies, with a commitment to quality animal care and education.  PETCO?s strategy is to offer customers a complete assortment of pet related products and services at competitive prices, with superior levels of customer service at convenient locations, by hiring pet lovers and training them to become counselors to pet loving customers.  PETCO operates more than 760 stores in 49 states and the District of Columbia , as well as a leading destination for on-line pet food and supplies at www.petco.com

The PETCO Foundation, PETCO?s non-profit organization, has raised more than $28 million since inception in 1999.  More than 3,300 non profit grassroots animal welfare organizations from around the nation have received support from the Foundation including AWRE and we Thank you  

 

18 February 2006

Well, it's official.  Baby season has started!!!

16 February 2006

I just got off the phone after speaking with Gary DeLong, who is a candidate for the third district (AWRE's district) city council here in Long Beach.  I must say that after the poor and rude reception AWRE has consistently received in the past from the Long Beach City Council members which includes the mayor, it was truly a pleasure to talk with someone running for office that seems to have a genuine concern for his districts environment and wildlife. I spoke briefly with Gary about our plans to build a permanent wildlife rehabilitation  facility in Long Beach and he responded in the most positive manner I could ask for.  I think our communities, our environment, our wildlife and AWRE has a good friend and supporter in Gary DeLong

6 February 2006

January seemed to pass by very quickly despite our usual seasonal lull in the action, so to speak  Our critter data for the month of January 2006 is published below for those of you with the interest.  We did treat 37 animals of 22 different species with a release ratio of 60%.  Great way to start the year

 

     
                                                                                                         Treating a Ring Tailed Lemur

 

20 January 2006

At this point January has been fairly quiet but I figure this is just "the lull before the storm", as baby season is quickly approaching and it seems every spring brings about a new Emerging Infectious Disease (EID) to deal with.  I wonder what it will be this year?  Hopefully just a variation of a known disease with a cure that is readily available as well as being affordable.  I guess it is one of those things we just get to wait and see and pray it passes us by.  Reminds me that AWRE was involved with the West Nile Virus  studies in the very early stages of its infestation of America back in the 90's and to be honest, I never dreamed the WNV was going to spread as thoroughly and as quickly as it did.  Let's all hope this year's new EID just doesn't happen.  

But on a brighter note, AWRE is well prepared to take on whatever is thrown our way and we are positive we will be able to beat any challenging situations/conditions and continue with the AWRE mission in the finest manner. All for our wildlife, all for our communities,  all for our environment,  all for our children and all per gratis, too!

3 January 2006

Another year has past and I must admit that the start of 2006 is much different than all the years past.  This year, 2006, AWRE is starting the year with a little money in the bank, (a little money, there are still NO salaries or paid employees of any sorts here at AWRE.  We are hoping and praying that some day after all the expenses for the animals are met, there might be enough left over so we could at least discuss the possibilities of salaries at one of our board meetings but, at this point, it is more of a joke around here as there is always something else which is necessary for the critters) now back to the subject of this new "attitude" AWRE is entering 2006 with, money in the bank, a new truck and the ability to start the year more concerned about improving our services to our environment and communities instead of worrying and struggling with the concept of "how can AWRE survive?"  What a great way to start a new year and it is mostly due to the kindness and generosity of the Long Beach Animal Hospital, the Employees of Boeing, Long Beach, California, THUMS Long Beach, and Future Design Communications.  We truly a very thankful for their benevolence but we also recognize their genuine concern and caring for our environment and especially their faith in our agency's instrumentation.  Thanks to them, we will be able to serve you better.  

Here's the yearly patient treatment data for 2005.  Another record breaking year.  1194 animals of 105 different species with 58% successfully released back into the wild.  Yes, we are very proud of ourselves, especially when you take into consideration the international effect  AWRE has had with being instrumental in the writing and implementation of animal cruelty laws in Pakistan and the aid with the development and design of wildlife facilities in Malaysia and the Philippines plus an assist in South Africa, just to name a few of AWRE's adventures in 2005.  It was a hard year but it turned out to be a good year and we  plan on even better results for 2006

Anyway, here are our treatment totals for 2005.

ALL WILDLIFE RESCUE & EDUCATION PATIENT DATA REPORT 

1 January 2005 through 31 December 2005

 

Species

# Treated

# Released

# Euthanised

#Died

# Placed

1) Peregrine Falcon

1

 

 

 

1

2) Red Tail Hawk

36

14

10

2

10

3) Brown Pelican

13

6

5

2

 

4) White Pelican

1

 

1

 

 

5) Kestrel

60

37

9

4

10

6) Harris Hawk

3

 

2

1

 

7) Striped Skunk

20

5

5

 

10

8) Chinese Goose

1

1

 

 

 

9) Pelagic Cormorant

4

 

 

4

 

10) Double Crested Cormorant

1

 

 

1

 

11) Pigeon

308

120

173

10

5

12) Loon

1

 

 

1

 

13) Coot

7

4

2

1

 

14) Dove

43

19

20

4

 

15) Sparrow

52

24

10

12

6

16) Parakeet

3

 

 

2

1

17) Western Gull

13

2

11

 

 

18) Herring Gull

5

 

5

 

 

19) California Gull

8

1

5

1

1

20) Earred Grebe

6

5

 

1

 

21) Anna?s Hummingbird

12

2

2

4

4

22) Red Earred Slider

11

8

 

 

3

23) Bullfrog

4

4

 

 

 

24) Auklet

1

1

 

 

 

25) Leach?s Storm Petrel

1

 

1

 

 

26) Pie Billed Grebe

3

 

 

3

 

27) Starling

17

10

6

1

 

28) Northern Flicker

2

 

2

 

 

29) Great Horned Owl

3

 

3

 

 

30) Herrmann?s Gull

1

 

 

1

 

31) House Finch

11

5

3

2

1

32) Mallard

75

40

5

1

29

33) Ring Neck Dove

14

7

3

3

1

34) Morning Dove

14

8

4

2

 

35) Chicken

1

 

 

 

1

36) Sharp Shined Hawk

3

1

1

1

 

37) Brandt?s Cormorant

4

2

1

1

 

38) Peking Duck

4

4

 

 

 

39) Tree Squirrel

15

8

5

 

2

40) Roof Rat

4

1

1

2

 

Species

# Treated

# Released

# Euthanised

#Died

# Placed

41) Opossum

157

49

19

9

80

42) Ring Bill Gull

7

1

5

 

1

43) Barn Owl

27

2

3

1

21

44) Crow

40

11

21

5

3

45) Great Blue Heron

10

5

3

2

 

46) Rabbit, Dom

2

 

 

 

2

47) Warbler

2

2

 

 

 

48) Surf Scoter

1

 

 

1

 

49) Flycatcher

2

2

 

 

 

50) Bohemian Waxwing

1

1

 

 

 

51) English Sparrow

3

2

 

1

 

52) Merganser

2

2

 

 

 

53) Night Heron

38

18

15

5

 

54) Lizard

1

1

 

 

 

55) Crested Sparrow

2

2

 

 

 

56) Pocket Gopher

1

 

 

1

 

57) Pacific Gopher Snake

2

1

1

 

 

58) Rabbit, Wild

5

2

3

 

 

59) Acorn Woodpecker

1

1

 

 

 

60) Jack Rabbit

1

1

 

 

 

61) Canary

1

 

 

 

1

62) Cockatiel

24

 

 

 

24

63) Mockingbird

9

4

 

 

5

64) Raven

5

 

5

 

 

65) Mitered Conure

3

1

1

1

 

66) Scrub Jay

6

2

3

1

 

67) Bull Snake

1

 

 

1

 

68) Hamster

1

 

 

1

 

69) Cooper?s Hawk

13

3

7

1

2

70) King Snake

1

 

 

1

 

72) Glossy Starling

1

 

 

 

1

73) Swallow

2

 

2

 

 

74) Raccoons

13

1

1

1

10

75) Harlequin Parakeet

1

 

 

 

1

76) Black Crowned Heron

1

 

1

 

 

77) Desert Tortoise

1

 

1

 

 

78) Ribbon Snake

1

 

1

 

 

79) Mouse

4

1

1

2

 

80) Green Back Heron

3

2

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Species

# Treated

# Released

# Euthanised

#Died

# Placed

81) Red Tail Boa Constrictor

1

 

 

 

1

82) Guinea Pig

1

 

1

 

 

83) Grouse

1

1

 

 

 

84) Lesser Prairie Chicken

1

1

 

 

 

85) Burmese Python

1

 

 

 

1

86) Red Shouldered Hawk

6

3

2

1

 

87) Merlin

1

 

 

1

 

88) Snowy Egret

1

 

1

 

 

89) Night Jar/Poorwill

4

4

 

 

 

90) Ruby Throated      Hummingbird

2

 

 

1

1

91) Ball Python

1

 

 

 

1

92) Parasitic Jaeger

1

 

 

1

 

93) Black Neck Stilt

1

 

1

 

 

94) Japanese Quail

1

 

 

 

1

95) Sanderling

1

1

 

 

 

96) Canada Goose

1

 

 

1

 

97) Kingfisher

1

1

 

 

 

98) Burrowing Owl

1

1

 

 

 

99) Red Tail Tropic Bird

1

 

1

 

 

100) Black Neck Stilt

1

 

1

 

 

101) Western Grebe

1

 

 

 

1

102) Kite

1

 

1

 

 

103) Lesser Tern

1

 

1

 

 

104)  Muscovy Duck

1

 

 

 

1

105) Box turtle

1

 

1

 

 

23 December 2005

   
Gandhi's quotation of "Deeds, Not Words" comes to mind right now and allow me to explain why....

   
We just received a grant from the Employees Fund of Boeing California, Long Beach and I realized that their donation was not just for AWRE and our injured wildlife services but it is for you and each and every person of all the communities  which AWRE serves.  Boeing's donation enables us to help you and everyone when stuck with the dilemma of what you are going to do when you find an injured animal or have any kind of "problems" dealing with wildlife..
    
    Yes, the Employees of Boeing California, Long Beach are watching out and helping us all, in a very fine manner  

    "Deeds, Not Words" sums it up quite nicely.

12 December 2005

John Campbell of Future Design Communications in Signal Hill, has donated a wonderful Nissan pick up truck to AWRE.  It means so much to all of us here at AWRE when someone steps up to the plate and gives us a hand with our wildlife rescue and education mission in such a big way.  We have never had such a major donation as this very well needed rescue vehicle, especially one in such great condition.  I just can't find the words to express our appreciation and thanks 

Our deepest and most sincere thanks to John Campbell and Future Design Communications for their kindness, generosity and their appreciation for the AWRE mission.  Thank you

 

11 December 2005

We finally have our publishing problems solved  and will be up dating the AWRE website on a more frequent basis.

 

    One of the more eventful happenings was the release of Palo a Red Tail Hawk which was brought to us by the Long Beach Animal Control with a drastically broken wing.  Under normal circumstances, this wonderful animal would have had to been euthanised due to the extreme nature of its injuries.  But fortunately, AWRE has the aid of Dr. Carl Palazzolo, DVM.  I've said it many times before that if it weren't for Dr. Palazzolo, AWRE would not be able to have the immensely positive results with the treatment of our injured wildlife, but this time, if it weren't for Dr. Palazzolo, this beautiful animal would be dead instead of living as a free being in its natural environment, habitat and home.  After a long and intense surgery session, this hawk was allowed to rest, heal and regain its strength until the bones had healed well enough to remove the pins. Once the pins were removed and the birds was back to normal, so to speak, he went to Billie, keeper of one of AWRE's satellite facilities which has a flight cage and truly a Guardian Angel for all .  This large flight cage allows the hawk to build its muscle and sharpen its flying and hunting skills before being released back into the wild.

  

 

      

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

  

The above pictures were taken and are courtesy of Dr. Palazzolo

13 October 2005

We are still open and treating any and all injured wildlife sent our way.  

2 August 2005

We are still here and open for business.  Please do not hesitate to call us or bring us any of your injured wildlife.  We will give them the best treatment in order to heal and release them back into their native habitat.

6 August 2005

   
Surprisingly, we are still open for business but I can't say for how much longer..  It seems we have been doing so much with so little for so long, we can do anything with nothing and we keep getting more patients, more injured wildlife everyday.  So we just keep moving forward, taking one day at a time, all the while hoping we will be able to open for business tomorrow..  Last month, July, we treated 194 animals which is the second highest number of animals AWRE has ever treated in one month since our conception.  Of course, we are not including when we responded to oil spills. Our patient data is listed below for those of you which are interested.

    This non-profit organization business concept of the corporation losing money and going under when it is treating the highest number of patients in the corporations history just blows me away.  But then you all have to remember AWRE's services are per gratis to all.  

    In reality, the ever increasing number of patients we are treating each month is only indicative of the need, necessity and demand of AWRE and our services rendered and the ever-decreasing donations are indicative of our need for a grant writer.  

    Despite the increasing demand for AWRE, our finances have us in the position where we may have to close down. Presently, we have to cut programs and projects and the first project to be cut is our research on skunk behavior and communications.  We are so close to a major break through  in deciphering and understanding one of their communication methods but due to lack of funding this project has been shut down.  Hopefully, this project will be completed when we find funding.  I optimistically use the word "when" instead of "if"  but, at this point in time,  each new day presents itself with another AWRE program or project which has to be terminated due to lack of funding.  But please remember, AWRE will never turn away any injured or sick animal.  We will always find a way to make sure all the animals brought to us, receive the very best and proper medical attention and treatment so it may be healed and returned back into its natural environment.  This is our ministry and with any luck, we will be open tomorrow.

31 July 2005

At this time I am very sad to announce the closing of AWRE.  

It seems our work load continues to increase and we are handling all the patients and animals properly but the business of operating a wildlife rescue facility is beginning to become a load in which we can no longer afford. There are so many unforeseen expenses which are starting to manifest,  in what seems to be a chain reaction manner, it is totally overwhelming.  As I have said before, our expenses continue to multiply while our donations diminish.

 At this exact point in time, AWRE is still open, operating and doing business as usual but that doesn't mean we will be opening tomorrow morning.  Yes, I am sorry to say, it is that serious. We will never turn an injured animal away but all of the other services we provide for our communities will start to cease one after another.  Well, that is until we, hopefully,  find the necessary funding to pick up where we left off.

I would like to thank all of those that have supported AWRE over the past many years.  Your support has allowed us to treat over 10,000 animals during the lifespan of AWRE, plus make countless educational presentations and help so many animals and citizens. 

It has truly been an honor to serve you all. Thank you.  

Your kindness and consideration are greatly appreciated.  Thank you

27 July 2005

We received one of our more unusual critters this week, a 9 foot Burmese Python weighing about 6 kilos.  What a beautiful animal, someone is sure missing their friend.  This snake is in excellent condition and has a very curios and friendly attitude.  Someone is definitely missing an animal they have spent a lot of time and care with.   but hopefully they will run into our "Found" ad or we will see their "Lost" ad, but  one way or another, we will do our best to get it back to its home and if not,  a proper, loving home for this wonderful python will be very easy to find.

21 July 2005

It seems we have a second baby season at hand.  This past week we have had an influx of baby Barn Owls, Kestrels, Red Tail Hawks, Cooper's Hawks, Mockingbirds, Possums and skunks.  I feel the second baby season is the result of the violent rains and storms we had earlier this year which resulted in most nests, dens and burrows being destroyed by either the rain, wind or floods.  Isn't Mother Nature cool in how she always manages to maintain a balance.  More later, as it is time for the midnight meds.

1 July 2005

June turned out to be another hectic month.  AWRE treated 185 animals of 31 different species in June plus all the phone calls.  Forty a day at least and this does not include all the time to run a non-profit corporation.  No wonder we are all so tired.  But I must admit it is quite rewarding being able to provide our services to our communities.  And all per gratis on top of that.  Tell me that isn't a win-win-win situation

23 June 2005
We are one step closer to starting our ground-breaking research on animal behavior and communication. We have finally found the equipment we need to monitor the inside of a den without disturbing the natural environment and natural behavior of the animals within the den.  We will be monitoring and recording all activities within and in the general outside vicinity of the den in hopes of learning more of their learned communications and yes, we do need your help. All this equipment is very expensive and can only be purchased with any funds leftover after taking care of our injured animals.  At this time, there are no funds available for said equipment due to the high patient load and the low funding situation.  If you would care to make a specific donation towards the purchase of this highly specialized equipment, we would be most grateful

May was another very busy month as you can see from our statistics in the chart below.  But I have to admit that June has been even busier than May but that is normal as is the fact each year AWRE is treating more and more animals.

 

8 June 2005

PETCO?s ?Spring a Pet? Campaign Blossoms for All Wildlife Rescue & Education

Long Beach 8 June 2005 ? The PETCO Foundation?s recent ?Spring a Pet? fundraiser will lead to a summer of contentment for companion animals across the country, thanks to the compassion of PETCO customers, vendors, and associates who ?showered? the in-store campaign with generous donations.  The event, which ran from March 13 to April 17, raised more than $1.83 million for grassroots animal welfare organizations including All Wildlife Rescue & Education

?Spring is in the air, but animal welfare is in the heart of every pet lover who donated so generously to our Spring a Pet campaign,? said Paul Jolly, Director of the PETCO Foundation.  ?Our record success truly demonstrates the PETCO family?s overwhelming love for companion animals, and we thank our customers, vendors, and associates for their continuing support.?

The fundraiser encouraged pet lovers to donate $1, $5, $10, or $20 to animal welfare causes.  Each donor received a personalized cutout bunny to display in their neighborhood store or take home as a reminder of their generosity.

This year?s national giving increased 22% over last year?s campaign, which collected over $1.51 million.  Each PETCO store  selected an animal welfare organization to be the recipient of money raised at their location.

How the Money Makes a Difference.  Local proceeds from Spring A Pet 2005 will be used by All Wildlife Rescue & Education to continue with their wildlife rescue and rehabilitation services for our community

? The only reason AWRE has been able to provide its services per gratis to our community for over 15 years is due to the generosity of private citizens and caring corporations like PETCO?, said Kim Thraen, Chief Executive Officer. 

PETCO (PETC-NASDAQ) is a leading specialty retailer of premium pet food and supplies, with a commitment to quality animal care and education.  PETCO?s strategy is to offer customers a complete assortment of pet related products and services at competitive prices, with superior levels of customer service at convenient locations, by hiring pet lovers and training them to become counselors to pet loving customers.  PETCO operates more than 740 neighborhood stores in 47 states and the District of Columbia, as well as a leading destination for on-line pet food and supplies at www.petco.com. 

The PETCO Foundation, PETCO?s non-profit organization, has raised more than $23 million since inception in 1999.  More than 2,700 non profit grassroots animal welfare organizations from around the nation have received support from the Foundation including AWRE and we  Thank you

12 May 2005
At this time I am very proud to announce that AWRE is about to embark on a new adventure.  This new adventure is the process of gathering the necessary information and data to conclude our revolutionary new scientific breakthrough in wild animal communications and behavior. It is estimated it will take us approximately ten years to gather all the data we need but it will probably take at least another ten years analyzing all this data once it is gathered. But proving our hypothesis about animal communications will be worth all the effort and expense.  Have no fear, AWRE is not going to abandon or even down-size in the least, our rescue, rehabilitation and education services.  All our regular duties will remain the same, it is just that we have expanded AWRE services yet one more time.  Please remember that you too can be part of the AWRE legacy simply by using the "donation" button above..  Thank you for your support

3 May 2005
Another hectic month but it is just "business as usual" here at AWRE during baby season.  Check our stats to see what I mean

 

30 April 2005

It has been brought to my attention that our patient load is larger than ever, our expenses are higher than ever but our donations are lower than ever.  With this in mind, AWRE is having serious trouble keeping our heads above water, above water??? Now there's a joke.  Lately it seems that we are quite lucky just to be able to pop our heads out of the water just long enough to catch a quick breath.  We plan to keep treating injured wildlife as long as we can but we will be forced to cut back on many things.  Unfortunately, the expense of our website will be a major consideration when it comes time to renew our contract with our server. This will be just one of our cut-backs but we will never turn an injured animal away or provide it with anything less than top-of-the-line medical treatment, but we need your help. We need your donation to be able to continue.  If AWRE has at sometime helped you , please return the favor and use the donation button above and we will be able to continue with our ministry.  It's up to you.  Remember, AWRE has never turned an injured animal away and we have never charged for our services.  Think about it.  How many companies do you know of that has been in existence for over 15 years, has never sold anything, is not subsidized by any government agency, has no paid employees, has never turned away any legitimate requests for help and has never charged for anything and is yet able to provide a top-of-the-line, cutting-edge service to all communities, not only locally but world wide?  If you use that donation button above, you can help us continue our ministry and become part of that legacy.  Thank you..

 28 March 2005

I have just been notified that our work with the Advocate High Court of Pakistan has presented the animal cruelty law and it will be accepted as a national law.  the law is:

Pakistan Penal Code 1860
 
Section 428.
Mischief by Killing or maiming animal of the value of Ten Rupees
 
Whoever commits mischief by killing , poisoning , maiming or rendering useless any animal or animals of the value of ten rupees or upwards, Shall be punished with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to two years, or with fine or with both.
 

As I said, we are very proud of AWRE's involvement with the process of protecting animals worldwide.

23 March 2005

At this time, AWRE is actively helping write, establish and set precedence of animal cruelty laws in the country of Pakistan.  We are working with the Advocate High Court of Pakistan and if things work out right, Pakistan will have the same animal cruelty laws as the state of California.  I must admit that we have truly impressed ourselves with the reach our humble organization has had.  Not only within the United States and our state of residence which is California but to be able to have such an effect on the laws of foreign countries such as Pakistan.  Yes, we are all very proud of ourselves but our mission is far from completed

3 March 2005

February has been the usual lull in our patient list.  We only treated 32 animals this month but we all know it is darkest before the storm as we are all gearing up for baby season.  one new item up our sleeves for this baby season is the grand opening of the Fowler Hilton 2.  This is the latest in the state-of-the-arts skunk foster care and rehabilitation unit.  It has everything imaginable, thanks to our most generous donor, it is going to be the nicest facility we could provide for our wildlife and our community.  We even have underground observation booths so we can observe our charges while they are in the privacy of their burrows and dens.   The Fowler Hilton 2 is truly the next step in wildlife rehab facilities.

 22 February 2005

PETCO's "TREE of HOPE" success plants seed for animal welfare.  Thanks to the compassion of customers, vendors and associates of PETCO Animal Supplies, Inc. who gave generously to the PETCO Foundation's 2004 "Tree of Hope" in-store fundraiser which ran from 21 November 04 through 24 December 04 "Thanks to the kindness of pet lovers across the country, animals in need will now enjoy a much happier New Year", PETCO Foundation Director Paul Jolly said.  "By supporting grassroots animal welfare programs nationwide, Tree of Hope donors have undoubtedly given these animals a reason to celebrate".

PETCO, based in San Diego, is a leading pet specialty retailer of premium pet food, supplies and services with a commitment to quality animal are and education.  PETCO's strategy is to offer its customers a complete assortment of pet-related products and services at competitive prices, with superior levels of customer service at convenient locations, by hiring pet lovers and training them to become counselors to their pet-loving customers. Check their on-line pet food and supplies at www.PETCO.com

The PETCO Foundation, PETCO's non profit organization, has raised more  than $21 million since inception in 19999.  More than 2500 non-profit grassroots animal welfare organizations, in which AWRE was so fortunate to be one of, from around the nation have received support from the Foundation.  We truly are appreciative of PETCO's generosity and dedication to making this a better world.  Thank you PETCO

18 January 2005

A few years ago, a good buddy of mine and I were working late into the night with an in vitro fertilization experiment and in the process I confused the container with the  rabbit sperm with the container holding the cat sperm and accidentally fertilized a cat ova with rabbit sperm.  The Cabbit is the results of said mistake.  Cabot the Cabbit was raised with cats and pretty much thinks of himself as a cat despite the facial characteristics and the rear-leg  locomotion of a rabbit and when startled he does hop off in quite a hurry.  His temperament is that of a pussycat, sweet, adorable and is happiest while curled in a warm lap and if the owner of that lap is willing to brush Cabot, you'll have a friend forever

                                                                  

5 January 2005

Another year and we have had another year where we treated more animals than ever before.  Here's the year end statistics for the animals we treated here at AWRE

ALL WILDLIFE RESCUE & EDUCATION PATIENT DATA REPORT 

1 January 2004 through 31 December 2004

 

Species

# Treated

#Released

#Euthanized

#Died

#Placed

1) Laysan Albatross

2

2

 

 

 

2) Red Tail Hawk

21

6

9

3

3

3) Red Shouldered Hawk

11

3

4

3

1

4) Kestrel

38

25

5

3

5

5) Peregrine Falcon

5

 

1

 

4

6) Acorn Woodpecker

1

 

1

 

 

7) Crow

170

59

76

24

11

8) Merganser

1

1

 

 

 

9) Pigeon

136

60

50

13

1

10) Western Gull

38

11

24

3

 

11) Anna?s Hummingbird

9

4

1

2

2

12) Cockatiel

2

 

 

 

2

13) Turkey, Domestic

2

 

 

 

2

14) Mallard

12

61

9

4

30

15) Striped Skunk

78

69

4

1

4 

16) Dove, Ring Necked

44

23

14

7

 

17) Ring Billed Gull

11

5

5

1

 

18) Common Teal

1

 

1

 

 

19) Opossum

118

30

15

15

58

20) Red Earred Slider

49

3

1

 

45

21) Pekin Duck

15

8

4

2

1

22) Goose, Domestic

6

4

1

1

 

23) Sparrow

64

45

7

12

 

24) Roof Rat

2

 

1

1

 

25) Alligator Lizard

1

1

 

 

 

26) Poorwill/Night Jar

4

4

 

 

 

27) California Gull

12

4

6

2

 

28) Cooper?s Hawk

13

2

10

1

 

29) Sharp Shinned Hawk

19

5

10

 

4

30) Night Heron

61

29

29

2

1

31) White Rat

1

 

 

 

1

32) Pie Billed Grebe

3

3

 

 

 

33) Rabbit

3

1

2

 

 

34) House Finch

10

5

3

2

 

35) Rabbit, Domestic

5

 

3

 

2

36) Barn Owl

13

1

2

2

8

37) Great Blue Heron

10

7

2

1

 

38) Scrub Jay

9

3

4

2

 

39) Raven

14

7

6

1

 

40) Earred Grebe

7

5

1

1

 

Species

# Treated

#Released

#Euthanized

#Died

#Placed

41) Great Horned Owl

9

 

3

 

6

42) Kingfisher

2

 

 

2

 

43) Brown Pelican

25

7

8

10

 

44) Grosbeak

1

 

1

 

 

45) Kite

1

 

 

1

 

46) Pelagic Cormorant

4

2

1

1

 

47) Merlin

2

 

2

 

 

48) Parakeet

3

 

 

 

3

49) Mitered Conure

5

 

1

3

1

50) Mole

2

1

 

1

 

51) Wren

2

2

 

 

 

52) Iguana

57

55

1

 

1

53) Red Parrot

1

 

 

1

 

54) Rooster

2

 

1

 

1

55) Coyote

1

 

1

 

 

56) Mockingbird

10

8

1

1

 

57) Starling

8

2

1

4

1

58) Morning Dove

5

1

 

4

 

59) Raccoon

2

1

 

1

 

60) Squirrel, Tree

46

29

8

5

4

61) Quail

1

1

 

 

 

62) Kangaroo Rat

1

1

 

 

 

63) Brandt?s Cormorant

4

3

 

1

 

64) Common Tern

1

 

1

 

 

65) Junko

1

1

 

 

 

66) Green Back Heron

3

3

 

 

 

67) Herring Gull

5

4

1

 

 

68) Fulmar

3

1

1

1

 

69) Snowy Egret

3

 

1

2

 

70) Oriole

1

 

 

1

 

71) Osprey

2

 

2

 

 

72) Phoebe

1

1

 

 

 

73) Warbler

1

 

1

 

 

74) Lovebirds

1

 

 

 

1

75) Goldfinch

2

1

1

 

 

76) Brewer?s Blackbird

3

2

 

1

 

77) Black Crown Heron

1

1

 

 

 

78) Robin

1

1

 

 

 

79) Button Quail

1

 

 

 

1

80) Cliff Swallow

1

1

 

 

 

 

                                    

Species

# Treated

#Released

#Euthanized

#Died

#Placed

81) Hamster

1

 

 

 

1

82) Herring Gull

4

2

 

1

 

83) Mouse

3

2

 

1

 

84) Cinnamon Teal

1

 

1

 

 

85) Muscovy Duck

1

1

 

 

 

86) Plum-Headed Parakeet

1

 

 

 

1

87) Coot

3

3

 

 

 

88) Saw Whet Owl

1

 

1

 

 

89) Black Necked Stilt

1

 

1

 

 

90) Plover

1

1

 

 

 

91) Shearwater

1

1

 

 

 

92) Lesser Tern

1

 

 

1

 

93) Burrowing Owl

1

1

 

 

 

94) Common Loon

1

1

 

 

 

95) Ferret

1

 

1

 

 

96) Canada Goose

2

1

1

 

 

97) Royal Python

1

 

 

 

1

98) Swan

1

 

 

1

 

99) Chinchilla

1

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

30 December 2004 

The picture below is that of one of our more unusual critter calls.  Early one morning we received a call concerning a turkey that was in our callers' backyard looking in their sliding glass door.  Upon arrival, I went around to the backyard and sitting at their backyard picnic table, having their morning tea, were two darling ladies and sitting between them was this turkey.  It was an easy capture, just had to pick him up and carry him out and place him in the cab of the truck.  We were able to place this bird at a local animal sanctuary.  The owner's of this sanctuary are familiar with AWRE's work and immediately named this bird after one of our crew members.  Although I consider this a big honor, the person which had the bird named after them has forbidden me to publish the further details. But here's a namesake from one of AWRE's cherished volunteers.  To quote Mahatma Gandhi, "Deeds, not words"

                                          

12 December 2004

I just love this picture taken at the Fowler Hilton, so many healthy, strong skunks ready for release back into their natural habitat.  Isn't it cool the results a properly balanced diet can make.  Here's a little contest for all of our readers... Can you tell me how many skunks are in this picture? Send your answer to info@awre.org

                                         

I have to admit that the addition of Chris Fowler to the AWRE team has been the best "happening" for not only AWRE but for all our wildlife, our communities and our environment.  I must admit, we all owe Chris, big time for all her efforts in making this world a better place for all.  T

 1 December 2004

Yesterday I had the privilege to address around 40 students of the Hiroshima School of Veterinary Medicine.  I was very honored to have been asked to help our visiting students learn about rehabilitating, treating and releasing  wildlife.  It was quite impressive how quickly these students picked up, grasped and ran with new concepts when presented to them.  I must admit that I was giving the translator a work out.  The translator earned my respect, I guess one can tell if one has started to ramble by how long the translator takes.  As I said, he really earned my respect with a job very well done. One big difference I noticed between these students and the American students that come through our facility (I'm 110% American, so I can say this and get away with it)  but ALL of the Japanese students took their education, their studies and their opportunity for an education ever-so-much-more seriously that the typical American.  I think we need to take a lesson here.

5 November 2004

We have just broken an AWRE record for the number of animals treated in one year.  We just treated our 1100 animal in 2004.  We are also very aware that if not for the kindness and efforts like those of Savannah Moody, Kelly Smiley, Boeing, Thums and our other faithful donors and  supporters, we would not have been able to answer our calling and make this accomplishment.  If that doesn't validate our community's need for AWRE nothing does.

 

 

23 October 2004

Another hectic month were everyone was much too busy treating our injured wildlife.  Hopefully next month it might slow down enough to catch  up with the website but being short-handed, under funded and over-worked AWRE is still up and treating any and all injured wildlife sent our way

29 September 2004

Every once in a great while we receive a donation that truly touches our hearts.  This is the story of such a donation. Earlier this summer, two young girls, Savannah Moody, 9, and Kelly Smiley, 10, decided they wanted to do something that mattered, they wanted to contribute to a  charity which they believed in.  Remember these are two caring, young girls that  want to make a difference in improving our environment, our wildlife and our community.  They decided to hold a fund raiser for AWRE. On the hottest day of the summer, these two loaded up their wagon, went to the beach and set up a lemonade stand and started selling lemonade, all to benefit  the injured animals AWRE is treating.  After a busy and successful day hard at work in the scorching Southern California sun, Savannah and Kelly donated all they made to AWRE.  With such a dedication and commitment at such an early age,  these two girls are really going to make a difference in our world, just as they have at AWRE.  We are very grateful of their hard work and their generosity to share the fruits of their labors with others.  I'm sure their parents are quite proud of their daughters, and rightly so cause I know we are

                                      

                                                                                    

 20 July 2004

Great news, Fish & Game ha finally processed our claims and it is just a matter of having the check clear.  AWRE is almost back into the black, almost, ... but at least now there is a light at the end of the tunnel.

6 July 2004

It is finally starting to slow down.  We only treated 170 animals in June 04 of 34 different types of species.  Our year to total is attached below for those who are interested. We are also still looking for a reliable rescue vehicle with not much luck but we do have a bright light at the end of the tunnel, just hope it runs.

29 June 2004

We have been swamped this baby season and if our finances aren't straightened out this is probably going to be AWRE's last.  It's not that we are a bunch of idiots that can't handle our affairs, it's that our wonderful Department of Fish & Game has stiffed us with $14,615.71 worth bills and have come up with one lame assed reason after another to delay payment. They haven't denied payment so we can't sue for the money, they are just delaying payment and some of these bills are now over a year old and these bills are causing AWRE to have to close its' doors. Gee, some might ponder the thought of my losing my time honored respect for our wonderful Department of Fish & Game, damn, I wonder why?  

Thank God for the wonderful employees of Boeing of California.  Right at our darkest moment, they jump in to the rescue with a grant which will ensure that AWRE will be here for our environment, citizens, community and wildlife for at least the rest of this season.  

We all want to thank you all at Boeing of California.  Thank you

20 April 2004

    The William C. Bannerman Foundation has most generously come forward with a specific donation towards the purchase of a new AWRE rescue vehicle.  We are all so appreciative of the kindness of the William C. Bannerman Foundation, we are at a total loss for words.  Thank you but thank you just doesn't seem to be enough as we are all very appreciative of your generosity and caring for our environment and AWRE mission.  Thank you.   I can guarantee we will do our best to see it goes as directed.  I must admit, it would be wonderful having a rescue vehicle that both doors worked, plus a slew of other things.  Yes, we are all very, very appreciative, grateful and thankful for the kindness and caring of the William c. Banneman Foundation.  Thank you

AWRE can also use your help.  As I stated earlier, we need a new rescue vehicle.  We need a small truck, good on gas mileage, in good working condition.  We need a truck that is reliable as we do use it in dangerous and hazardous situations and conditions when the rescue calls for it. 

    If you or know someone who has a small truck fitting this description and is interested in selling it, please call me at (562) 434-0141 And yes, I will give you my pitch on how you can donate some or all of the sales price of the vehicle, but WE DO HAVE CASH IN HAND AND ARE READY TO DEAL

12 March 2004

Baby season is now up and running and is gaining momentum.  But this year, we have an advantage, a big advantage.  The Meade Corporation has kindly and most generously outfitted our prohibited species team with some much needed lab equipment. I mean top of the line microscopes, quality optical instruments which will enable the complete prohibited species team to have the much needed diagnostic equipment at all of our satellite locations.  Meade Corporation's generosity is truly a statement which shows they care about our wildlife and environment and are willing to actually DO something other than just talk about it.  AWRE and all our patients will definitely benefit from Meade's actions and I am personally very, very thankful

 

    The first two months of the year have been fairly slow.  This is usual from past records.  I guess it is the lull before the storm we call baby season.

12 February 2004

2003 was a record year for AWRE we treated 1047 animals of 100 different species. Our Patient totals are charted below for those that have interest in the actual species and the numbers of said species we treated in the year 2003.  We hope our involvement with the California Department of Fish & Game continues to grow.  I must admit that it has been a very enlightening and gratifying experience to work with such fine, dedicated officers.  It's good to know our wildlife is in such good hands especially when there are such evil people out there

ALL WILDLIFE RESCUE & EDUCATION PATIENT DATA REPORT 2003

 

 

Species

Treated

Released

Euthanized

Died

Placed

 

1) Red Tail Hawk

18

6

6

3

3

 

2) Hummingbird, Anna?s

15

4

2

2

7

 

3) Hamster

1

 

1

 

 

 

4) Sharp Shinned Hawk

20

5

11

4

 

 

5) Pigeon

183

78

63

17

2

 

6) Crow

108

27

76

16

6

 

7) Widgeon

1

 

1

 

 

 

8) Pelican, Brown

15

4

1

10

 

 

9) Heron, Great Blue

14

7

7

 

 

 

10) Coopers Hawk

11

2

6

4

 

 

11) Brandt?s Cormorant

8

4

3

1

 

 

12) Kestrel

24

18

2

1

3

 

13) Rat, Roof

2

 

1

1

 

 

14) Dove

60

27

20

12

1

 

15) Earred Grebe

3

3

 

 

 

 

16) Gull, Western

26

7

18

1

1

 

17) Parakeet

4

 

 

1

3

 

18) Loon, Common

3

3

 

 

 

 

19) Snowy Egret

2

 

2

 

 

 

20) Opossum

137

288

6

11

92

 

21) Hedgehog

1

 

 

1

 

 

22) Striped Skunk

64

39

1

1

23

 

23) Pelagic Cormorant

5

1

1

3

 

 

24) Ring Billed Gull

5

4

1

 

 

 

25) Surf Scoter

2

1

1

 

 

 

26) Red Head Parrot

1

 

 

1

 

 

27) Cockatiel

1

 

 

 

1

 

28) Alligator Lizard

2

1

1

 

 

 

29) House Finch

12

5

3

3

1

 

30) California Gull

7

3

3

1

 

 

31) Great Horned Owl

1

1

 

 

 

 

32) Western Grebe

3

 

3

 

 

 

33) Starling

17

5

3

8

1

 

34) Mallard

58

43

6

8

1

 

35) Squirrel, Tree

13

6

3

 

4

 

36) Sparrow

77

41

23

12

 

 

37)BlackCrownNight Heron

26

13

10

1

2

 

38) Mobile Cooter

1

1

 

 

 

 

39) Chinchilla

2

 

 

 

2

 

40) Barn Owl

10

5

1

 

4

 

41) Gopher Snake

2

 

 

2

 

 

42) Scrub Jay

10

7

1

2

 

 

43) Uromastix